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The Bruce Grime Collection, 1950s and 60s photos

Posted on - 18th June, 2023 - 7:00pm | Author - | Posted in - History, Nostalgia, Preston News
A Karrier Colt fish fryer litter collection vehicle from 1935 Pic: The Grimes Collection
A Karrier Colt fish fryer litter collection vehicle from 1935 Pic: The Grimes Collection

The Bruce Grime Collection is available to be viewed on Preston Digital Archive. The collection features a fascinating range of subjects, from the 1950s and 1960s. However there is a bias towards vehicles and transport, so let’s start with refuse collection, as it used to be.

A life of Grime (sorry)

In the 1960s, refuse collection was a simpler occupation. There was no uniform and the refuse collectors are not wearing enough kit to go up Everest. The vehicle is also quite a lot smaller than modern vehicles. This era was long before recycling, however packaging tended to be more card and cardboard-based than today’s plastics. Note the metal bins. There were still a lot of coal fires in the 1960s, and plastic bins would have melted with the hot ashes.

Note the old X type TV aerials on the chimney. When BBC Two started in 1964, you could spot the rich people who had a UHF set due to the aerial, which was a different shape.

Bin collection 1960s style Pic: The Grimes Collection
Bin collection 1960s style Pic: The Grimes Collection

The below vehicle was new in 1988, and was known as the fish friar due to the chip shop style doors. These were mainly used for litter collection.

The latest addition to the Corporation fleet of refuse vehicles Pic: The Grimes Collection
The latest addition to the Corporation fleet of refuse vehicles Pic: The Grimes Collection

Ships and Preston Dock

The Tug Frank Jamieson at Preston Docks in the 1950s Pic: The Grimes Collection
The tug Frank Jamieson at Preston Docks in the 1950s Pic: The Grimes Collection

Tugs were used at Preston Docks to berth larger ships. The Frank Jamieson was a Scottish built ship launched in 1956. The engine was built in Manchester by Crossley Brothers Ltd. It would have been relatively new when the image above was taken in the late 1950s. The registered owner was Preston Borough Council.

After Preston Docks closed in 1981, the Frank Jamieson went to James Fisher and Son Ltd, Barrow. Unfortunately, the tug was broken up in 1987. Frank Jamieson was the Mayor of Preston from 1949 to 1950 and there were two tugs ordered at the same time. Both were named after Preston’s mayors.

A trainspotter at Preston Station

A Royal Scot Class locomotive at Preston Station Pic: The Grimes Collection
A Royal Scot Class locomotive at Preston Station Pic: The Grimes Collection

The 1950s was still the age of the train, and here a Royal Scot Class locomotive waits to head north, under Fishergate bridge. On the left, a trainspotter is observing events. Notably, the tender sports the original British Railways lion logo. Trainspotting was a popular pastime in the 1950s, especially amongst children. Ian Allen issued a series of locomotive guides. There was much more variety to be seen than there is now. A wide range of steam and diesel locomotives were in operation, some dating from the 1920s.

Follow Geoffrey on Twitter for more Preston history.

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